By Bob Catanzarite
swhowto.com

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Chapter 1

The Central Wiring Panel
Chapter2

Finishing

Coax Stripping

Coax Terminating

Compensate for
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CATx Stripping
and Terminating
Chapter 1

CATx Stripping
and Terminating
Chapter 2

Home Network
Wiring and Setup
Chapter 1

Home Network
Wiring and Setup
Chapter 2

Home Network
Wiring and Setup
Chapter 3

Home Network
Wiring and Setup
Chapter 4

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VOIP (Voice Over Internet Protocol)

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Chapter 1

Wireless
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Chapter 2

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  2001
Bob Catanzarite

 

 

 

 

 

Terminating Coax Cable - How To

 

This step will vary depending on the particular connector style you are using. Today we have basically two styles of Type-F connectors to choose from. When I did my wiring in the spring of 2000 there really was only one type that I came across that was reasonably priced and readily available. So I used the crimp on style. Now a newer and easier to use connector is somewhat reasonably priced and readily available. These newer connectors are commonly called compression type and are made by Augat/T&B (Snap-N-Seal), Paladin (SealTite) and AIM (CATV "F" waterproof) among others.

 

                                    

 

The crimp type is on the left and the compression type is on the right.

I used the crimp on type for my project but I have since switched to the compression style. Believe me, the compression style is a lot easier to use. And they seem to be a more reliable connector. And, as you may have guessed, they cost more. And they require a different tool to apply the two  connectors. The good news is that the same process for STRIPPING coax cables that I have given in this website work equally well with both styles of connectors without doing anything differently.

The folks at HomeTech have an excellent selection of parts and tools and an equally excellent website. They have a very useful 'Learn More' section that, among other things, describes the simple process of installing these two connector type so I'll just link you to what they have already provided.

http://www.hometech.com/learn/coaxterm.html

I took their advice on the use of the Channel-Lock pliers to hold the crimp type connector. Here is what they say about that:

"This is the hardest part of installing crimp connectors on quad-shield coax. You need some way to hold the connector, keep it from spinning, not crush the easily bent "crimp" area, and yet allow the center conductor to stick out of the end. I found a little pair of Channel-Lock pliers work well."

This does work well!

 

 

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